Today is: 
17 October 2018 

How to understand the other youth...

 

Issue 9 - July 2013
What has been...

 

The importance of fatherly love...

 

Issue 7 - May 2013

''Aziza, 21, is engaged...

 

Why Islam Prohibits the recreational use of marijuana...

 

Issue 7- May 2013

Drawing on the rulings...

 

Walk into the face of your fears...

 

Issue 6 - April 2013

I cannot tell you...

 

This is my story. What’s yours?...

 

Issue 6 - April 2013

Being a victim...

 

Muslim Youth: An identity crisis...

 

Issue 5- Mar 2013

Only individuals who succeed in...

 

Marriage... first thought that pops up...Will it last?...

 

Issue 4 - Feb 2013
First of...

 

No one to talk to...

 

Issue 4 - Feb 2013
Batool had...

 

Religion: a Joy or a Burden...

 

ISSUE 3-Jan 2013
Whenever I attend a religious ceremony,...

 

I Want to Talk to Me....

 

ISSUE 3 JAN 2013 -Sometimes I like ...

 

Muslim Youth and Drugs: The Reality...

 

ISSUE 3 JAN 2013 - “It only happens...

 

SOLUTION ...

 

ISSUE 2 - DEC 2012

Sometimes situations...

 

Book review Meet the Masumeen – with class 786 ...

 

ISSUE 2 Dec. 2012 - Is a book with a...

 

Mediator...

 

ISSUE 1 Nov. 2012 -

Sometimes situations arise...

 

Adjusting to University Life...

 

ISSUE 1- Nov 2012

Youths throughout ...

 

 

Evolving Revelation

issue 28 - July / August 2015

In 1965, under the direction of Pope Paul VI, the Second Vatican Council made historic changes to the Church’s policies and theology. These changes were crystallised in a document known as Nostra Aetate, Latin for ‘In Our Time,’ a document that revolutionised the Catholic Church’s approach towards other religions. For the first time it acknowledged the possibility that other religions ‘reflect rays of that Truth which enlightens all men’. In this document the Catholic Church attempted to introduce new terms for dialogue with specific references to Judaism and Islam. The church was attempting to redress a centuries-long painful relationship.
The Nostra Aetate was an open call to the Church to dialogue with other world religions from a premise of an acknowledged existence of common grounds especially in relation to the other monotheistic faiths of the Abrahamic branch; Judaism and Islam. In relation to Islam we read:
‘The Church regards with esteem also the Muslims. They adore the one God, living and subsisting in Himself; merciful and all-powerful, the Creator of heaven and earth, who has spoken to men; they take pains to submit wholeheartedly to even His inscrutable decrees, just as Abraham, with whom the faith of Islam takes pleasure in linking itself, submitted to God. Though they do not
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